Eunjung Lim is a lecturer of Korea Studies at Johns Hopkins SAIS. Her areas of specialization are South Korean and Japanese political economy, comparative politics, and energy security policies of East Asian countries. She has been a researcher and visiting fellow at several institutes including the Center for Contemporary Korean Studies at Interfaculty Initiative in Information Studies at the University of Tokyo, the Institute of Japanese Studies at Seoul National University, the Institute of Japan Studies at Kookmin University, and Institute of Energy Economics, Japan. Before joining the SAIS faculty, Eunjung Lim taught at several universities in Korea, including Yonsei University and Korea University. She earned a B.A. from the University of Tokyo, an M.I.A. from Columbia University and a Ph.D from SAIS, Johns Hopkins University. She is fluent in Korean, Japanese and English.


1. How would you define a good leader?
A good leader needs to make a good decision.To make a good decision, a good leader should have analytical minds and be decisive.
For better analyses, logical thinking is prerequisite and collecting data or listening to others (not only your friends) can be crucial to support your logic.

2. Have you had any mentors in your life? If so, what impact did they have on your personal and professional development?
Of course, I have many. The most prominent thing of them is how sincerely they tried to understand me and my situations. They have been sympathetic and inspiring. They showed their sincere minds to support me.

3. What does being part of the naisA Global mentoring program mean to you?
I feel blessed to be surrounded by great people including my mentors. I want to pay back what I received to the society, and would love to support Asians.

4. What advice would you give your 20 year old self?
Read more books.

5. How do you de-stress?
Gym and movies.

6. What do you do to ensure your continued growth and development as a leader?
Through more diverse social activities including naisA.

7. What college course do you regret not taking as a student?
Physics.

8. What has been your proudest achievement in your career? Why?
I have been an educator, and thankfully have been teaching at my Alma Mater, which is rare and proud.